Monday, June 15, 2015

Standing up for Fatigue | Gresham College

Standing up for Fatigue | Gresham College

Thursday, April 16, 2015

Toward a clearer diagnosis of chronic fatigue syndrome -- ScienceDaily

Toward a clearer diagnosis of chronic fatigue syndrome -- ScienceDaily

"
The researchers performed PET scanning on nine people diagnosed with CFS/ME and ten healthy people, and asked them to complete a questionnaire describing their levels of fatigue, cognitive impairment, pain, and depression. For the PET scan they used a protein that is expressed by microglia and astrocyte cells, which are known to be active in neuroinflammation.
The researchers found that neuroinflammation is higher in CFS/ME patients than in healthy people. They also found that inflammation in certain areas of the brain -- the cingulate cortex, hippocampus, amygdala, thalamus, midbrain, and pons -- was elevated in a way that correlated with the symptoms, so that for instance, patients who reported impaired cognition tended to demonstrate neuroinflammation in the amygdala, which is known to be involved in cognition. This provides clear evidence of the association between neuroinflammation and the symptoms experienced by patients with CFS/ME.
Though the study was a small one, confirmation of the concept that PET scanning could be used as an objective test for CFS/ME could lead to better diagnosis and ultimately to the development of new therapies to provide relief to the many people around the world afflicted by this condition."

Wednesday, February 18, 2015

What causes RBCs to become sticky in the first place

What causes RBCs to become sticky in the first place
Expert:  Carlos replied 3 years ago.
Dear JACUSTOMER 9avzrh26:Agglutination (clumping) of type A red blood cells (RBCs) by anti-A antibodies. The antibodies have two combining sites and are able to attach to the A antigens on adjacent RBCs, thus causing the RBCs to bond together.

Stickiness of red blood cells or the clumping of the red blood cells together is called autoagglutination.
The presence of antibodies (usually IgM) on the surface of red blood cells is responsible for the phenomenon of autoagglutination. Agglutination can be observed during immune-mediated hemolytic anemia, but also during 'cryoglobulinemia' ( a far more rare condition).


Read more: http://www.justanswer.com/health/53x6z-causes-rbcs-become-sticky-first-place.html#ixzz3S7paoxo7

Wednesday, February 04, 2015

Breakthrough magazine | ME Research UK

Breakthrough magazine | ME Research UK

"ME Research UK publishes its own magazine Breakthrough approximately twice a year, featuring updates on projects funded by the charity, recent research from around the world, information about Friends’ fundraising activities, and other articles on ME/CFS issues.
Read or download back issues of Breakthrough here."

Tuesday, February 03, 2015

Anthony Jones (Institute of Brain, Behaviour and Mental Health - University of Manchester)

Anthony Jones (Institute of Brain, Behaviour and Mental Health - University of Manchester)
Previous research has concentrated on the development of new techniques to identify the network of brain structures in the human brain that is involved in nociceptive processing and some of the endogenous pharmacological processes that may modify this. We were the first group to achieve these two goals. The main applications have been in musculoskeletal and post-stroke pain. Candidate mechanisms for fibromyalgia and post-stoke pain have been identified by recent PET studies; funded by our Arthritis Research Campaign program grant and previous MRC grants.

Thursday, January 22, 2015

The Biggest Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Treatment Trial Begins: Fluge/Mella On Rituximab | Simmaron ResearchSimmaron Research

The Biggest Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Treatment Trial Begins: Fluge/Mella On Rituximab | Simmaron ResearchSimmaron Research

"Doctor’s Fluge and Mella shocked the ME/CFS world with their 2009  case series and the 29-person 2011 study which found that about 2/3rds  of ME/CFS patients had a significant and positive response to the chemotherapy  and autoimmune drug Rituximab. With some patients achieving near miraculous recoveries, the results from Norway had the ME/CFS world buzzing - See more at: http://simmaronresearch.com/2015/01/chronic-fatigue-syndrome-rituximab-fluge-mella/#sthash.SFxye1AD.dpuf"

Saturday, December 13, 2014

Research Digest – December 2014: 10 Important Advances in ME/CFS | Solve ME/CFS Initiative

Research Digest – December 2014: 10 Important Advances in ME/CFS | Solve ME/CFS Initiative
While progress is still far too slow, there have been many recent interesting and important discoveries in ME/CFS. In this year-end blog post, Dr. Vernon and Dr. Komaroff summarize what they regard as the most important recent advances in our field