Tuesday, July 07, 2009

Picasa Web Albums - Danescrest, Brompton, Northallerton - Danescrest, Brompton, Northallerton



"Behind Danescrest, Brompton, Northallerton looking left at the well tended garden area"

Picasa Web Albums - Danescrest, Brompton, Northallerton - Danescrest, Brompton, Northallerton


"Behind Danescrest, Brompton, Northallerton looking right at the eyesore area"

Picasa Web Albums - Danescrest, Brompton, Northallerton - Danescrest, Brompton, Northallerton

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What is M.E.? - M.E. is a neurological disease and stands for Myalgic Encephalomyelitis.

What is M.E.? - M.E. is a neurological disease and stands for Myalgic Encephalomyelitis.: "These Xenon SPECT scans show pathological brain changes in a 37 year-old female M.E. patient. They show abnormally decreased brain perfusion (blood flow) which decreases further after exercise.

In contrast, a healthy person’s brain would normally show an increase in brain perfusion (blood flow) after exercise. Dr. Byron Hyde from the Nightingale Research Foundation, Canada, believes that every M.E. patient has some kind of abnormal SPECT scan. (Reference page 7, The Nightingale, Myalgic Encephalomyelitis M.E. Definition, 2007 :-
www.nightingale.ca)"

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What is M.E.? - M.E. is a neurological disease and stands for Myalgic Encephalomyelitis.

What is M.E.? - M.E. is a neurological disease and stands for Myalgic Encephalomyelitis.: "M.E. is a neurological disease(1) and stands for Myalgic Encephalomyelitis.

My = muscle
Algic = pain
Encephalo = brain
Mye = spinal chord
Itis = inflammation
It is an injury to the Central Nervous System(2). usually triggered by an infectious disease process, e.g. a virus, or by chemicals over stimulating the immune system(3). It is a multi-system disease, affecting not only the neurological system but also the immune, musculoskeletal, endocrine (hormonal) and cardiovascular systems(4).

Prognosis is variable depending on how much and which part of the brain has been damaged(5). Complete pre-illness recovery is rare but possible (around 6% of cases.)(6) Some improvement, even marked improvement (different from full remission) is more likely than complete recovery, although relapses can occur several years after remission(7). Most cases stabilise at varying degrees of disability(8). Around 30% of cases are progressive and degenerative and degeneration of end organs may result in death(9). (One quote of early death rate in M.E. is 10%.This figure includes suicides(10). Early death from cardiac pathology is put at 2%(11). Pancreatic failure can also contribute to early death(12).)

Symptoms can be multiple and vary from person to person but common symptoms include post-exertional malaise, cognitive problems (such as short-term memory loss and concentration difficulties), muscle and nerve pain, muscle weakness, noise and light sensitivity, sleep and temperature disturbance, orthostatic intolerance (inability to sustain upright activity e.g. standing, sitting or walking) and sensitivity to food, alcohol, chemicals and medicines."

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Sunday, July 05, 2009

Dr. Logan on H2S, Fiber and the Gut | Bringing the Heat: An ME/CFS Blog

Dr. Logan on H2S, Fiber and the Gut | Bringing the Heat: An ME/CFS Blog: "common remedy for bacterial overgrowth in the gastrointestinal system involves antibiotics. Yet antibiotics, paradoxically, are sometimes blamed for setting the stage for bacterial overgrowth in the first place. Many people are not surprisingly skeptical about taking antibiotics because of this. How do you go about ensuring that you’re not just making the problem worse?
Indeed, there have been studies showing that antibiotics have reduced small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and improves a variety of symptoms (including brain-related symptoms) in CFS and fibromyalgia. Yet, these are very small studies of small duration. What happens when the antibiotics are stopped and the patients are followed in the long term? We do not know. Given that antibiotics and overuse of acid-blocking medications set the stage for SIBO, I would be inclined to worry about using antibiotics as a means of clearing SIBO. I would be more inclined to use probiotics and enteric-coated peppermint oil.
There are quite a few different kinds of probiotics on the market that feature different kinds of bacteria. Are there certain kinds of bacteria that may be more helpful for the kinds of gastrointestinal issues that chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) patients face?
Yes, the benefits appear to be strain-specific. If it is for symptoms that resemble that of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) then I would suggest 2 strains of bacteria that have been shown to be helpful for gut-related symptoms – Align (Bifidobacteria infantis 35624) and LactoFlamX (Lactobacillus plantarum 299V). In our University of Toronto study, we used a probiotic made by the Japanese company Yakult. The strain, Lactobacillus casei Shirota had been found previously to improve mental outlook in healthy volunteers who had th"

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Dr. Logan on H2S, Fiber and the Gut | Bringing the Heat: An ME/CFS Blog

Dr. Logan on H2S, Fiber and the Gut | Bringing the Heat: An ME/CFS Blog

Explains so many of my symptoms & experiences over the past 35 years. . .

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